The Common Cold and Kids with Special Needs

The Common Cold.  Nobody enjoys them. For most of us it’s a week of being uncomfortable and then on we go.  Unless, of course you are a medically fragile kid with special needs.  Combining something as simple as the common cold and medically fragile kids with special needs can be a life threatening situation.

Parker started sounding junky on Friday.  By Sunday he had full blown symptoms including a nose that wouldn’t quit running and a cough that sounded like his lungs were giving up the ghost.

Baby Booger Sucker

A Baby Booger Grabber.  Hook this baby up to a suction machine and there’s nowhere for the snot to hide.

Today we’re needing to keep Parker on his vent in order to keep his oxygen sats where they need to be.  We’re suctioning and temperature taking and cranking up the oxygen concentrator as needed.  Parker’s lungs sound even worse than yesterday, and all you have to do is put your hand on his chest and feel how cruddy they sound

LTV Vent

You’ve got to love a machine that keeps your kid alive.  Even if you hate it at the same exact time.

But this is nothing compared to Parker’s buddy Aaron.  For Aaron, the Rhino Virus comes with an ambu bag, 12 liters of oxygen and a multi-day stay in the PICU.

Good times.

Not.

Parker is pretty much past (knock on wood) the days where a simple virus would put him in the hospital.  Having a hospital room at home, plus his trach helps with being able to care for him here.

One thing we’ve been using that has helped to keep snot infused issues like Parker’s under control is saline that has an antibiotic mixed in with it.  You can use over the counter saline and over the counter antibiotic, but I preferred to have our pharmacy compound Parker’s.

We have to cuff Parker’s trach, make a quick spray up his nose, suction it back out, and then suction his trach out just in case any went down the back of his throat.  I was really nervous because Parker’s aspirates on everything.

Usually when he has this kind of thing going on it goes straight into a sinus infection and then we had to go to oral antibiotics and then he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis from the constant antibiotic use.

antibiotic saline spray

The antibacterial saline spray has been fantastic for Parker and has made it so that he hasn’t been on oral antibiotics for almost 2 years now.*   (Knock on wood.)

How many times a year does your child need antibiotics?  Is your child considered medically fragile?  Have you used antibacterial nose sprays with your child?

*I am not a doctor, nor am I smart enough to play one on the internet.  Please don’t do anything with your child that you haven’t received the green light from your Doc to do. 

 

 

 

 

 

About Tammy and Parker

Special Needs Blogger, and homeschooling Mom, heavily involved in advocacy for all kids with special needs in Utah.

Comments

  1. You put the common cold into perspective for all of us. Next time we want to complain about having a cold, we just need to read this post and I think we’ll all be grateful it’s just a cold. Hope Parker gets over this cold soon.

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